Posts Tagged ‘why is it called black friday’

Here is a List of
Thanksgiving
Myths and Legends
That Might
Surprise You!

1. Thanksgiving Has Been Celebrated Every Year Since 1621

1 Thanksgiving Has Been Celebrated Every Year Since 1621THE MYTH: Thanksgiving has been celebrated consistently since its first event as an magnificent feast together when the Pilgrims and Indians ate at the same table.

THE TRUTH: Up until the 1940’s, Thanksgiving had a sparse history of being praised. After the first Thanksgiving, thought to happen in late September or early October, there were intermittent festivals of thanksgiving for good farming harvests among the 13 Colonies, and the First National Proclamation of Thanksgiving was proclaimed in 1777.

Up until the onset of the Civil War, there was a random assortment of national days of prayer, humiliation, and thanksgiving.” A few of the presidents celebrated them consistently every year, some never acknowledged some of the holidays we celebrate these days.

2. Thanksgiving Always is the 4th Thursday in November

2 Thanksgiving is Always the 4th Thursday in NovemberTHE MYTH: Thanksgiving has consistently been on the Fourth Thursday of November.

THE TRUTH: Thanksgiving was celebrated on an extensive variety of days in November until the Civil War. At that point, a tribute to the nations unity, President Lincoln declared a national Thanksgiving Day, to be praised on the LAST Thursday in November 1863. The future Presidents proceeded with President Lincoln’s proclamation, but President Roosevelt set the occasion as occurring on the Fourth Thursday of November in 1939.

November had five Thursdays that year, and Roosevelt didn’t need retailers to lose the important opportunity for a week of Christmas sales. Actually, for a couple of years after that, the occasion occurred on the next to the last Thursday of the month, and it was just in 1941 that Roosevelt officially signed a government law making the Fourth Thursday in November the official day Thanksgiving would be commended from that day forward.

3. The Clothes that Pilgrim’s Wore

3 pilgrim-clothing-photo-u2THE MYTH: Pilgrims wore their ordinary dress of high contrast black & white suits, and tall buckled hats with black shoes.

THE TRUTH: This was really a famous fashion in Britain, however, not until the 1700’s. It went into present day (at the time) portrayals of the first Pilgrims in America, yet its not what they really wore. Metal buckles would be excessively pricy to wear for everyday, and the black and white suits, likewise very costly to make, would have been worn for more church gatherings on Sundays and special occasions.

The rest of the week, early American Pilgrims wore the colorful clothing that they had brought with them from across the big pond.

4. Feasting to Celebrate Thankfulness

4 dining-in-gratitude-photo-u1THE MYTH: The 1st Thanksgiving was based on two separate cultures coming together  in appreciation.

THE TRUTH: The 1st feast where the Pilgrims and native American Indians took place was really a harvest celebration. Any celebration to give thanks to God would have been an entirely religious occasion that would be only for white settlers,and at that time partying and  enjoyment was not permitted. Only focused on prayer and dignity with respect to the church.It is much more probable that the Pilgrims were celebrating the exceptional harvest from this new land they are living off of, when the Indians stopped by to see what all the noise was from the Pilgrim’s clamor and gun shots. They were permitted to stay, and a thus the myth was conceived.
5.  Huge Gathering and Feasting

5 a-huge-sit-down-dinner-photo-u1THE MYTH: Pilgrims and Indians sat down to supper together at a gigantic table overflowing with delicious food and forks, knives and spoons.

THE TRUTH: The harvest party of 1621 was a three-day celebration, with individuals coming and going throughout the celebration, eating wherever they discovered room, most likely with their bare hands. The Pilgrims in the New World unquestionably didn’t bring extravagant china and silver with them, and would have made meals that could be eaten by hand and carried around easily.

6. Turkey Makes You Tired

6 turkey-makes-you-sleepy-photo-u2THE MYTH: The tryptophan in turkey makes you drowsy.

THE TRUTH: This is actually true, however not as society views it. The tryptophan in turkey does help make serotonin, which is a key hormone in managing slumber. Yet the turkey would need to be consumed on an entirely empty stomach, and won’t really affect your brain chemicals if you are hording a lot of other foods with the turkey.The drowsy feeling from consuming a ton of turkey is more probable a blend of things such as fatigue from a sometimes stressful day of being around family, liquor use, and the general tiredness that originates from consuming an excessive amount of food and the body needs to use blood that is being used by the brain (resulting in less blood in the brain) is now redirected to the digestive framework.
7. The Typical Thanksgiving Menu

7 the-thanksgiving-menu-photo-u1THE MYTH: The official Thanksgiving Dinner consists of turkey, cranberry sauce, stuffing, and pumpkin pie in light of the fact that the Pilgrims and Indians consumed it together.

THE TRUTH: Our customary Thanksgiving menu is built considerably more with respect to what’s for the most part served at New England fall harvest celebrations, and has gotten to be enormously redone by different regions throughout America. Depictions of the 1st Thanksgiving incorporate notice of fowl, yet not exactly turkey after all. Pumpkin may have been served, however not in any sort of solidified pie structure, while the locally grown vegetables and even fish would have had prominent spot at the banquet.

What’s more, sweet potatoes weren’t brought into America until long after the Pioneers arrived in New England, being because it had been brought there by Spanish settlers on their way back to Europe from South America.

8. President Truman’s Turkey Pardon
8 truman-s-turkey-pardon-photo-u1THE MYTH: Harry Truman was the first American President to offer an officially pardon a turkey from slaughter, he picked between two turkeys one to be spared in 1947.THE TRUTH: This is one of the more common urban legends that goes around consistently. It’s halfway genuine, however for the most part false. 1947 was the first year that a free turkey was supplied to the White House, however the winged creature was for Christmas, not Thanksgiving, and it wasn’t pardoned, it was consumed by the President and his family on Christmas.While a few presidents playfully alluded to turkeys they weren’t going to consume as being “pardoned,” the first president to truly pardon and save a turkey in a White House was incredibly recent! George  W. Bush in 1989.
9. Thanksgiving False Flag Attack

9 thanksgiving-false-flag-attack-photo-u1THE MYTH: The United States government is arranging a Thanksgiving false flag attack to development their motivation of endlessly taking away our rights and/or starting wars.

THE TRUTH: You can go back in time to 2008 to discover different affirmations that an enormous false flag attack was going to occur on Thanksgiving of that year. The same unclear doomsday argument is repeated consistently, and is never even talked about when it doesn’t happen.

10. Obama’s Pardoned Turkey was Killed Anyway

10 obama-s-pardoned-turkey-was-killed-anyway-photo-u2THE MYTH: A turkey that had been “pardoned” by President Obama was put down in spite of his pardon.

THE TRUTH: One might say, all exonerated turkeys in the long run pass on. However, doubtlessly, the turkey that was pardoned in 2012 by President Obama, named Cobbler, was euthanized the following summer. The purpose behind this is basic: it was sick and dieing, as the turkeys reproduced for use on Thanksgiving are intended to just live for couple of years. All of the acquitted turkeys kick the bucket not long after their pardoning ceremony, which is entirely for show.

11. Stealth Halal Turkeys

11 stealth-halal-turkeys-photo-u1THE MYTH: Turkey farmers are giving in to Muslims and are secretly giving Americans halal fledglings slaughtered in compliance with Islamic laws.

THE TRUTH: The “stealth halal turkey” meme begins with Pamela Geller the essayist and noted adversary of all things Islam. On her website, Geller tells of activist Islam “on the march” as exemplified by turkeys being butchered to affirm to Islamic halal details. Geller contemplated that we were all subtly consuming terrorist turkey, and to blacklist Butterball particularly.

Notwithstanding, Geller misses various focuses in her meander, the slightest of which is that Muslim dietary laws are practically precisely the same as Jewish dietary laws, and few individuals outside of the most vigorous white supremacists would shrug off the thought of consuming a turkey that happens to be butchered in a fit strategy.

While Butterball does confirm some of its turkeys Kosher, it would not make sense that all Thanksgiving turkeys be affirmed either Kosher or halal, that would be unreasonably expensive. Likewise, consuming meat that happens to be halal doesn’t make one Muslim, any longer than consuming meat that happens to be Kosher makes one Jewish.

12. Black Friday is the Most Lucrative Shopping Day of the Year
12 black-friday-is-the-most-lucrative-shopping-day-of-the-year-photo-u1THE MYTH: The shopping extravaganza following Thanksgiving is the most lucrative retail shopping day of the year.THE TRUTH: Notwithstanding the enormous media buildup over post-Thanksgiving deals, sales, human stampedes, and people embarrassing themselves for 20% off an iPod, The day after Thanksgiving wasn’t generally the most lucrative day of the shopping season. The days paving the way up to Christmas have far more sales. Up until 2003, the Saturday before Christmas generally won the “prize” of seeing a greater number of dollars spent than on any other day of the year.Actually, before 2002, Black Friday following Thanksgiving never came in higher than fourth in amount of sales. In any case, the determined drive to huge sales and get more people flooding into stores earlier in the Christmas season, and Black Friday following Thanksgiving did turn into the busiest shopping day of the year in 2003, a questionable honor it has held consistently every year since then, with the exception of 2004. But, in the end, the days paving the way to Christmas still see the most enormous consumer spending.
13. Why is it Called Black Friday?

13 black-friday-s-name-photo-u1THE MYTH: Black Friday got its name from either being the day slaves were liberated or the day stores went into the dark for the year.

THE TRUTH: The “Black Friday” name is something that no one can truly clarify the beginnings of, however we know a considerable amount about where it didn’t originate from. For one thing, it has literally nothing to do with slaves. It was initially referenced in a 1951 daily newspaper article, and didn’t significantly allude to shopping, just to being a day when many employees called in sick.

It later was utilized contemptuously as a part of Philadelphia to allude to the giant swarms of people and massive traffic jams that came about because of Black Friday shopping. Also, the reference to stores being in the black didn’t show up in the news until the 1990’s, long after the term had become popular.

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